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Archive for July, 2008

Many thanks to Oz, I finally found a Vietnamese Theravada temple in Southern California. On top of that, when searching for the temple address, I found a list of all Vietnamese Theravada temples on Binh Anson’s website.

The Vietnamese word for Theravada is Nguyên thủy, which means something along the lines of “original” or “primitive”, as in xã hội nguyên thủy (primitive society), so if you click on Binh Anson’s link, look for the term chùa Nguyên thủy ‘Theravada temple’.

Below I’ve copied the list of Vietnamese Theravada temples outside of Vietnam. Enjoy!

  • Chùa Pháp Vân, Pomona, California
  • Thích Ca Thiền Viện, Riverside, California
  • Như Lai Thiền Viện, San Jose, California
  • Chùa Phật Pháp, St Petersburg, Florida
  • Pháp Đăng Thiền Viện, Spring Hill, Florida
  • Chùa Pháp Luân, Houston, Texas
  • Chùa Đạo Quang, Garland, Texas
  • Chùa Hương Đạo, Fort Worth, Texas
  • Chùa Liên Hoa, Irving, Texas
  • Chùa Bửu Môn, Port Arthur, Texas
  • Chùa Kỳ Viên, Washington DC
  • Bát Nhã Thiền Viện, Montréal, Québec
  • Chùa Kỳ Viên, Paris, France
  • Chùa Phật Bảo, Paris, France

Again, follow the link above to get addresses and contact information, although there are some typos. For example, “3 rue de Broca, Savigny-sur-Orges” should be “3 rue Brocca, Savigny-sur-Orge”.

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A teacher of mine once commented that Buddhism had no room for hope – and he grounded this accusation on the understanding that hope is wanting things to be different than they are, and that Buddhist practice is about accepting things as they are.

Explained in that way it seems reasonable enough, but something about adhering to a hopeless religion seems iffy, especially when Buddhism has so many things which look like hope, but my own misgivings were much more personal.

I remember that when I first heard that from my teacher I felt very disappointed, because I had adopted a language of hope. I hoped others had nice days, I hope that people got good restful nights of sleep, as well as excellent hockey tickets and doubles from vending machines. Most importantly though, I hoped that good things happened to others, because I desperately wanted to stop wishing people “good luck.”

(more…)

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